Busboys and Poets in Anacostia May Not Open Until 2018

Rendering of planned Busboys and Poets in Anacostia

by Nena Perry-Brown

Six months ago, construction began at the future site of the first Busboys and Poets restaurant east of the Anacostia River. However, it doesn’t look like the restaurant will open this year as originally planned.

The building at 2004-2010 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE (map) is currently being built out by nonprofit partner and landlord the Far Southeast Family Strengthening Collaborative; however, construction is running roughly three months behind schedule, owner-restaurateur Andy Shallal informed UrbanTurf last week.

2004-2010 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE

Work on the space that Busboys will occupy was supposed to begin in June once the Collaborative completed their work. Now, factoring in the delay, Shallal and his team likely won’t begin their work until September, at which time it would take an additional 4-5 months to deliver the restaurant. The delay and construction timeline puts an opening date closer to late December-February 2018.

Article From: http://buff.ly/2tkXeMj

Top 10 New Technologies in Dentistry

By 123Dentist

Check out the top 10 new technologies in dentistry treatment: VLscope, digital X-Rays, invisalign, laser dentistry and more!http://buff.ly/2vbMsc4

If there’s a need, we are right here! Check out our website and learn more about out oral surgery services! http://buff.ly/2vbQwcn

. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

The field of dentistry is constantly evolving and changing to best suit patient needs. 123Dentist is always on the lookout for new and emerging technology to make our patients’ experience as comfortable as possible. Here is just a few of the different technologies that 123Dentist practices use to ensure we provide world-class service to all our patients:

1. VELscope—VELscope is a special type of light that a dentist will shine in a patient’s mouth to detect any abnormalities. This new form of technology is effectively used to detect early forms of cancer or disease during an oral cancer screening.

2. Digital X-Rays—Digital X-rays are faster and contain less radiation than traditional X-rays. When a patient has a digital X-ray done, the image appears on the computer in a matter of seconds. Your dentist can then zoom into the image to better assess and educate the patient regarding their oral health. Digital X-rays are also less harmful for patients as they contain up to 90% less radiation compared to traditional X-rays.

3. Invisalign—Invisalign are clear, practically invisible braces that can gently straighten your teeth. They provide an effective and comfortable way to straighten your smile without the inconvenience of wearing heavy, metal braces. Invisalign braces are easy to take out for cleaning and don’t require a restriction on what type of foods to eat. They get the job done in less time with less hassle.

4. Laser Dentistry—Lasers are used to improve efficiency and eliminate discomfort in a number dental procedures, including filling cavities, reducing tooth sensitivity, getting rid of tumors, and whitening. Laser dentistry is fast, painless, and can effectively eliminate any form of bacteria during the procedure to avoid any further complications or problems.

5. Dental Implants—Dental implants are screw-replacements for the root portion of missing teeth. Implants are used to restore healthy smiles when patients have missing teeth. Implants are effective because they can replace missing teeth, while still giving the patient the feel and look of a natural tooth.

6. HealOzone—HealOzone is a fast, easy and painless way to eliminate tooth decay. HealOzone is effective because it contains ozone (O3), which is a common, natural gas that effectively kills bacteria and fungus. HealOzone is a great tool to detect and get rid of any early signs of tooth decay before it progresses to a more advanced stage.

7. DIAGNOdent— DIAGNOdent is a new, state of the art device that dentists use to detect cavities that are hiding in places regular x-rays can’t find. It ensures that your mouth has been thoroughly checked for early signs of cavities to avoid you having to spend more in the future if the cavities progress and expand.

8. Intraoral Camera—The intraoral camera is a tool that dentists use to gain precise and well-defined pictures of hard to see places within a patient’s mouth. The camera also allows dentist to show these images to patients while assessing and educating the patient’s needs. This new form of technology allows dentist to conduct a thorough checkup of your mouth and better assess their patient’s oral care needs.

9. Zoom! Whitening—Zoom! Whitening is a new, state of the art whitening treatment that gives our patients fast and easy results. In just one appointment, Zoom! Whitening can make a significant change in a person’s smile and can make their teeth up to eight shades whiter.

10. Nitrous Oxide and (Intravenous) IV Sedation—Nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, can calm a patient down to a point that they are relaxed but can still interact with their dentist. On the other hand, IV sedation puts a patient to sleep completely so that they are unaware of what happened during their dental session. This is usually recommended for patients who are fearful of going to the dentist or for procedures that are painful such as wisdom teeth extraction.

Article From: https://www.123dentist.com/top-10-new-technologies-in-dentistry/

 

Poor oral health contributes to 6 common diseases

By Lori Alton, NaturalHealth365

😳 Did you know chronic inflammation of the gums can affect your entire body?

Here are the top 6 diseases you can contract from poor oral health. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

(NaturalHealth365) “Giving up junk food.” “Getting off the sofa.” “Quitting smoking.” These are the common, and beneficial, lifestyle changes that many people adopt when they become serious about avoiding heart disease and cancer. But, what about poor oral health? (does your doctor appreciate the danger?)

I understand: making an appointment with a licensed dental hygienist just doesn’t have the same sense of urgency as seeing your cardiologist for a checkup – but, maybe it should. When it comes to preventing chronic, life-threatening diseases, maintaining good oral health may be one of the more important things you can do.

Sadly, there are literally millions and millions of people that walk uninformed about how gum disease can set the stage for six serious diseases. Keep in mind, these horrific health problems are completely avoidable – when given the right information. (keep reading to learn more)

Warning: Chronic inflammation of the gums can affect the entire body

Researchers and scientists now believe that inflammation – which can include the chronic inflammation that accompanies poor oral health – is at the root of most chronic diseases. In fact, the potentially life-threatening conditions associated with periodontal disease include diabetes, stroke, cancer, serious respiratory infections, heart disease and obesity.

Periodontal disease occurs in two primary forms: gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis involves inflammation that affects the soft tissue surrounding teeth – namely, the gums. Symptoms include reddened gums, swollen gums, bad breath and bleeding upon brushing or flossing. If untreated, gingivitis can progress to periodontitis, a more serious condition in which pathogenic bacteria progressively damage the periodontal ligaments and jaw bone and cause tooth loss.

The main culprit behind periodontal disease is plaque – a sticky, bacteria-laden film that forms on teeth and gums in response to starches and sugars in foods. Plaque eventually hardens into tartar, which is so resistant to brushing that it can only be removed via professional cleaning by a qualified, dental hygienist.

Plaque and tartar – and the bacteria they harbor – can build up and eventually cause destruction of gums and bone, along with loss of teeth. However, it is not just teeth and gums that are affected. Researchers are finding that periodontal disease carries grave implications for the entire body.

Recent studies link poor oral health with obesity, stroke and heart disease

The inflammatory cytokines that accompany periodontitis can contribute to obesity by raising levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation which causes fat cells to accumulate more fat – while burning less energy.

This fact of metabolism was reinforced by a 2016 study, in which researchers found that risk of obesity was higher in people with a lower daily frequency of tooth brushing and use of secondary oral products (such as dental floss).

In addition, two 2016 studies found that participants who had been diagnosed with periodontitis had a higher risk of stroke – as well as a higher risk of dying from all causes, including heart disease.

In 2015, a 26-year study showed that inflamed gums were associated with stroke risk, leading the researchers to point out that their results highlighted the important role of oral health personnel in the prevention of stroke.

To be clear: periodontal disease is strongly associated with increased risk of heart disease. Fortunately, it appears that the risk can be reduced with proper treatment. Researchers are finding that lowering systemic inflammation decreases the risk of atherosclerosis and inflammation-linked cardiovascular events such as heart attack – as well as risk of stroke.

Beware: Periodontal disease will increase your risk of cancer

In a prospective study involving over 48,000 male health professionals aged 40 to 75, researchers found that participants with a history of periodontal disease had an increased risk of cancer – particularly of the lung, kidney and pancreas. The study, which was conducted by researchers at Harvard Medical School and published in Lancet Oncology, revealed that the association persisted even for participants who had never smoked cigarettes.

Researchers called for more study, noting that periodontal disease could merely be a marker of a susceptible immune system – or could be a factor directly affecting cancer risk. Either way, the association is concerning.

As if this weren’t enough reason to take periodontal disease seriously, a 2016 study published in the International Journal of Cancer showed that periodontal disease increases the risk of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Periodontal disease has serious implications for diabetics

Scientists now know that periodontal disease can worsen the severity of diabetes, and even contribute to its onset. A study involving participants with type 2 diabetes showed that severe periodontitis was strongly linked with increased risk of poor blood sugar control.

And, the conditions seem to be interrelated. For example, studies show that people with diabetes who control their blood sugar are at lower risk of developing periodontal disease than those with poorer glucose control – a very significant finding.

By the way, treating periodontal infection and reducing oral inflammation in diabetic patients causes significant improvements in hemoglobin A1c – a long-term measurement of blood sugar control. Simply put, improving dental health helps to prevent the complications and consequences associated with diabetes.

Gum disease can set the stage for respiratory infections – including pneumonia

As strange as it sounds, gum disease can even affect your ability – or lack thereof – to fight off respiratory infections.

A form of pneumonia that affects elderly adults occurs more often when dental health is poor. Researchers believe this is a result of periodontal bacteria in the secretions of the mouth and pharynx being aspirated into the lungs.

Interestingly, a six-month Japanese study of aging adults showed that only one out of 98 participants developed a respiratory infection when the group was under the care of dental hygienists. In marked contrast, 9 out of 92 people – almost 10 percent – who did not get dental care came down with respiratory infections.

Natural compounds can treat gum disease and support oral health

Fortunately, natural substances can be used as effective oral topical agents to treat periodontal disease.

Studies have shown that catechins in green tea extract are antibacterial against S. mutans, one of the primary pathogens behind tooth decay. Green tea extract also inhibits the “stickiness” of bacteria – making them less apt to cling to teeth – while inhibiting production of amylase, which bacteria employ to break starches down to sugars.

Topically applied aloe vera can help soothe and heal inflamed gum tissues – while fighting pathogenic bacteria. In one promising 2016 study, researchers credited aloe vera with preventing and curing gingivitis.

The unique fizzing action of hydrogen peroxide combats oral bacteria that are difficult to reach with conventional brushing and flossing. Studies have shown that applying diluted hydrogen peroxide to the gums of patients with periodontitis can cause significant improvements.

Other natural techniques to treat gum disease include gargling with Himalayan sea salt, “oil pulling” with coconut oil, and the use of essential oils, vitamin C with quercetin and herbal mouthwashes – designed to be antibacterial and antiviral.

Article From: https://www.naturalhealth365.com/oral-health-inflammation-2250.html

What would a month without sugar mean to your child’s teeth?

By Campaign Dental Health

What would a month without sugar mean to your child’s teeth? Check out the results of the project “A Month Without Sugar” and consider making a plan for yourself and your family. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

 

Thanks in large part to national efforts to combat and prevent childhood obesity, we are all increasingly aware of the harms posed by the amount of sugar in our diets.

David Leonhardt of the New York Times proposes a new year’s resolution of sorts in A Month Without Sugar, an op-ed in which he describes his own efforts to avoid added sugars in his diet for a 30-day period. He shares that, although not easy, his sugar hiatus has helped reset his appetite for sweet foods and made him much more aware of insidious sources of unhealthy ingredients.

Healthy Food America and Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health projected the health impacts in a scenario where 15 of the country’s largest cities join the six that already have imposed taxes on sugary drinks. They estimated reductions in the rate of diabetes and the number of cases of obesity that would be prevented as a result of the tax’s effect on consumer choices, and they are significant.

Unfortunately, the analysis could not include the amount of dental disease that would be averted but we know that, especially when replaced by water with fluoride, reducing the consumption of sugary drinks reduces tooth decay.

Whether your concern is diabetes, dental health or healthy weight, drinking water with fluoride is easy, economical and good for you. Make 2017 the year you take the challenge to eliminate added sugars for one month and discover how that kick starts a new approach to your family’s health!

 

Article from: http://bit.ly/2u2arGu

The Power of Sour on Your Teeth

By Media Planet 

You know that weird coating you get on your teeth and tongue when you eat certain candies? Sour foods can be just as damaging to your teeth as sweets due to their high acidity! Learn more about the damage they can cause below. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

 

It’s not a pretty picture

Sucking and chewing sour candies has become a popular and seemingly harmless treat, especially among children, teens and young adults.

In fact, the acid in sour candies weakens and wears away tooth enamel, which is essential to healthy teeth. In some cases, the damage can be very severe and lead to permanent tooth loss.

The hard facts about sour candies

  • In the past 20 years, candies mar keted to children have increasingly been of a “fruity” or “sour” variety.
  • Sour candies are very acidic, with a low pH level (see chart).
  • Some candy is so acidic it can actually burn gums and cheeks.
  • Acid weakens and wears away tooth enamel.
  • Teeth without protective enamel are prone to tooth decay.
  • Each acid attack lasts about 20 minutes.
  • Holding the acid in your mouth by prolonged candy sucking or chewing continues the acid attack.

The signs of tooth erosion

  • You may not notice tooth erosion in its early stages. However, sensitivity and discoloration are early warning signs that can lead to more severe stages with continued acid attacks.
  • Warning signs of tooth erosion include:
  • Sensitivity occurs when tooth enamel wears away. You may feel a twinge of pain when consuming hot, cold, or sweet foods and drinks.
  • Discoloration is visible as a slight yellow appearance on the tooth surface.
  • Transparency of the front teeth appears along the biting edges.
  • Rounding of teeth occurs along the surfaces and edges of the teeth.
  • Cracks and roughness appear along the edges of the teeth.
  • Dents (known as cupping) develop on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. At this severe stage, fillings may actually appear to rise up.
  • Tooth decay is caused by loss of the protective outermost layer of enamel.

How to protect your teeth

  • The best protection against tooth erosion is preventing acid attacks on your teeth. Eliminating or decreasing consumption of sour candies is the fi rst line of defense against potential permanent damage of your teeth.
  • Reduce or eliminate consumption of sour candies.
  • Don’t suck or chew sour candies for long periods of time. Ongoing sucking prolongs acid attacks on your teeth.
  • If you do eat a sour candy, swish your mouth with water, drink milk, or eat cheese afterwards to neutral – ize the acids.
  • Chew sugar-free gum to produce saliva which protects tooth enamel.
  • After eating sour candy or other acidic food or drinks, wait one hour before brushing teeth. Brushing right away increases the harmful effects of acid on teeth.
  • Ask your dentist about ways to reduce sensitivity or minimize enamel loss if erosion has begun.
  • Use fluoride toothpaste and a soft toothbrush to protect your teeth.

 

Article from: http://bit.ly/2tNDySm

Foods That Fight Mouth Bacteria

By SFGATE

FUN FACT: Apples help kill bacteria in the mouth that causes bad breath! Learn more about other foods that fight bacteria below. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

 

An apple is a natural tooth cleaner. The fiber content of the skin gently scraps plaque from the surface of your teeth. Its high water content keeps it from sticking to your enamel and it gives you vitamins that promote healthy gum tissue. Other foods are good tools for oral health as well, offering benefits similar to those of apples, but also providing anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties. Some stop the growth of existing bacteria in your mouth and some even kill the pathogens that can cause infections and periodontal disease.

Cranberries

Cranberry juice may help stop plaque from forming in your mouth. According to a group of researchers from Israel who published their findings in the “Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy” in 2004, cranberry juice helps stop the growth of biofilms, collections of microorganisms that grow on your teeth and cause tooth decay and periodontal disease. Because previous studies had shown that non-dialysable material in cranberry juice stops the growth of a variety of oral bacteria, the researchers believe that its ability to keep biofilms from collecting may add to the cranberry’s benefits to your oral health.

Grape products

Dr. Christine Wu, of the College of Dentistry at University of Illinois, has conducted a series of studies on the effect of grape products on teeth. In one of them, published in the “Journal of Nutrition” in 2009, she says that raisins contain antimicrobial compounds that can keep oral pathogens from growing, preventing dental diseases. She also tested grape seed extract and found that it promotes remineralization of tooth enamel after root procedures. Grapes, which are rich in polyphenols, flavonoids, iron, potassium, calcium and B vitamins, promote general health, she adds, which is also beneficial for oral health.

Blackberries

Blackberries may kill pathogens that cause periodontal infections, according to researchers from the University of North Carolina and University of Kentucky. In 2012, they published a study in the “Journal of Periodontal Research” in which they subjected 10 types of mouth bacteria to blackberry extract and found that it offers more than just anti-inflammatory benefits. The compound, they concluded, also showed anti-viral activity, as well as antibacterial properties that reduced the amount of damaging pathogens that cause periodontal disease.

Garlic

Garlic is known for giving people bad breath, but its antimicrobial properties may make it a good tool to kill mouth bacteria. According to researchers from South Yorkshire, UK, who published a study in the “Archives of Oral Biology,” garlic contains allicin, which inhibits the activity of a compound that causes periodontitis. Garlic also fights gingivalis, a bacteria associated with periodontal disease. The researchers suggest that garlic extract or allicin may be helpful for preventing or treating some types of oral disease.

 

Article from: http://bit.ly/2uCohTc

5 natural remedies for gum disease that are better than toothpaste or mouthwash

By The Hearty Soul

Tell your friends that there are 5 natural remedies for gum disease that are better than toothpaste or mouthwash, and yes, one of them is chocolate! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team 

 

According to the CDC Division of Oral Health, nearly 50% of American adults and more than 70% over the age of 65 suffer from gum disease, also known as periodontitis or periodontal disease. Gum pain and the effect it has on eating aren’t the only concerns. Studies have shown gum disease is linked to heart and vascular disease. But, there’s good news! You can effectively support your oral health at home and avoid suffering from gum disease.

Symptoms of Gum Disease

Red, swollen gums, or gingivitis, is commonly the first symptom. You may know this condition by the very sensitive, sore gums that may bleed when you brush and floss your teeth. Constant bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth may also indicate periodontal disease. Symptoms of full onset of gum disease include pain while chewing, gums pulling away from your teeth, pus between your gums and teeth, or a loose tooth or teeth.

Causes of Gum Disease and Gingivitis

Poor dental hygiene is the number one factor that leads to gum disease. It allows bacterial growth in your mouth, and while some bacteria are friendly, many are not. Most of the sugar-loaded, processed foods we eat encourage the growth of these ‘bad’ bacteria in the plaque that forms between your teeth and gums. Without proper brushing and flossing, the bacteria can cause inflammation and if left untreated, it can lead to the erosion of the gum tissue and bone in your jaw.

While oral hygiene is the number one determining factor for gum health, some conditions may increase the risk. Hormonal changes, like those during pregnancy, puberty, and menopause can increase gum sensitivity. The high blood sugar of diabetes weakens the immune system and allows bad bacteria to take hold.

Smoking damages gum tissue reducing its ability to recover. And if your family has a history of gum disease, you may be genetically inclined to it, but that doesn’t mean you’ll get it; you just need to take care of your teeth and gums. It may be possible to reduce the risk of serious diseases simply by approaching your gum health.

Natural Home Remedies for Gum Health

Natural home remedies have healed gum disease for centuries. Here are five simple ways to avoid periodontal disease you can start using today:

Salt Water

Salt water kills bacteria and cleanses the infected area of the gums. Mix 1 Tbsp of sea salt in a cup of warm water. Swish it around in your mouth for a minute or two and then spit it out.

Sage

The anti-inflammatory and cleansing properties of sage have made it a home remedy for centuries. Chop up a fresh sage leaf or take a pinch of dried sage, rub it on the infected area of your gum and then pack it on the infected area. Leave it for 2-3 minutes. Mix in sea salt with the sage for additional cleaning.

Turmeric

The curcumin in turmeric possesses powerful anti-inflammatory effects and turmeric also has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. This cleanses the wound and encourages healing. Combine turmeric powder with water or mash up some fresh turmeric root. Brush this paste onto your teeth and gums with a soft toothbrush.

Oil Pulling

Oil pulling is an ancient technique has been used for centuries to keep the teeth and gums healthy. It uses oil to cleanse infected areas and help the gums heal. Take a tablespoon of sesame, coconut, or sunflower oil and swish it around your mouth for a couple minutes, focusing on the infected gum. Spit out (do not swallow!) and rinse immediately with warm water.

Baking Soda

This may be the simplest preventative solution around. You could use a baking soda paste regularly instead of toothpaste, but be careful–baking soda is highly abrasive and should be used gently in combination with olive oil. If your gums do get infected, rather than brushing it on, make a paste of baking soda and water and apply it to your gums. Do this for 2 minutes, two to three times a week.

Ozonated Olive Oil Boosts Oral Health

In some cases, unhealthy gums may need a more powerful response and ozonated olive oil can deliver powerful healing right at your home. [1] Olive oil helps clean and supply essential vitamins to the gums, and studies show topically applied ozone acts fast to improve wound healing and gum injuries without side effects. [2] [3] Research finds it is effective against swollen gums and the bleeding gums. In one clinical trial, patients using ozonated oil healed “significantly” faster than the control group that used normal healing protocols. [4] And take it from one of my clients, ozonated oil works!

“Great for my gums! Dentist told me I had the gums of a 60 year old (I’m 31). I started swishing with O2-Zap® after brushing my teeth and my gums are getting healthier. This stuff is now part of my dental regimen. Thanks!” – Ben

 

Article from: http://bit.ly/2vbsVZW

Why Sharks Don’t Get Cavities

By Megan Garber, The Atlantic 

Should sharks be our role models for oral hygiene? Learn about the two species with “toothpaste-teeth”! The Woodview Oral Surgery 

 

Sharks live lives that are, to human sensibilities, mostly unenviable. The creatures are constantly moving. They are hunted by predators far higher than they are on the food chain. They are often made to dine on manmade trash. They are totally oblivious to the subtler plot points of Orange Is the New Black.

But sharks, as a group, do have one evolutionary leg (fin?) up on us humans — one that has nothing to do with the terrifying sharpness of their enormous teeth and everything to do with the evolutionary resilience of those teeth. Sharks, it turns out, can’t get cavities.

In part, that puts sharks in company with most non-human animals. While creatures who don’t have access to Colgate have dental problems just like we do — among them tartar buildup that can cause gum disease — cavities are a largely human affliction, the result (for the most part) of our affinity for sugar.

What makes sharks unique, however, is that their teeth seem to be coated in fluoride. Yes: coated in fluoride. According to research published last year in the Journal of Structural Biology, at least two species of sharks, makos and tiger sharks, feature teeth whose outer coatings “contained one hundred percent fluoride.” Which is a nice cuspid coup. It’d be, for us, essentially like walking around with a perma-coating of toothpaste on our teeth.

While the Structural Biology research focused only on the two species, the makos and tiger sharks were chosen precisely because they feed in such different ways: makos rip the flesh off their prey, messily, while tiger sharks use their teeth to neatly slice through their meals. Since both species feature toothpaste-teeth, there’s reason to believe that those teeth are a feature enjoyed by other shark species, as well. And the choppers don’t just protect sharks against tooth decay: since teeth coated with fluoroapatites are less water-soluble than hydroxyapatites— the stuff that coats most mammals’ teeth, including our own — sharks’ teeth are also particularly suited to their underwater environment.

So take a moment to appreciate the elegantly Darwinian design of shark teeth. Then push your thoughts of those teeth aside to where they belong: your nightmares.

 

Article from: http://theatln.tc/2tGwhzL

The Secret To Better Teeth Found In Beer Breweries

By Jason Tetro, Popular Science 

Are beer hops the secret to superior oral health? The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

 

On St. Patrick’s Day, millions of people worldwide will raise their beer glasses and offer a cheer to the patron saint of Ireland in hopes of better fortunes in the future. While the majority of toasts will involve personal happiness, friendship and wealth, there is another blessing that could come from buying the sudsy symbol: better teeth and overall health.

Though there may be a bounty of beer recipes worldwide, they all have a very common ingredient list comprised of water, malt, yeast and hops. The latter, biologically known as the flowers of the Humulus genus of plants, which also includes cannabis, has been traditionally known for giving the beer a unique taste. However, hops have served a second purpose, determined back in the 18th Century when England began to export to the colonies.

Because of the length of time needed to travel, beer had the propensity to spoil to a variety of bacteria. Yet, those that had a higher proportion of hops in the recipe appeared to survive without any significant product loss. This led to the requirement of hops not to offer a fulfilling flavor, but to stay fresh. Eventually, hops became a critical component in any beer recipe; a tradition that continues until today.

Although the beer bacterial burden was solved, microbiologists, curious individuals that they are, wanted to know why that was the case. The answer wasn’t known until 1937 when the antiseptic properties of hops were finally seen. When exposed to a hop extract, bacteria simply couldn’t survive. The finding not only gave more reason to drink hoppy beer, but also opened the door to a natural means of infection prevention.

Over the next 80 years, researchers identified specific chemicals in hop extracts and tested them to determine if there were any useful antimicrobials. Back in 1949 one of the components of the extract, lupulone, was tested as an antibiotic; it failed. Over a half-century later, however, the same extract proved to be an effective killer of tuberculosis. Another component, xanthohumol, was tested to determine its ability to kill viruses; this time it was quite effective. The same compound was also shown to have an anti-malarial activity.

But perhaps the most positive results have come from the world of odontology. For centuries, dentists have been trying to find natural means to prevent gum disease, which is an inflammatory process sparked by bacteria. When the antimicrobial activity of hops were found, dentists decided that it was at least worth a try. What they have found reveals that not only are they good for the mouth, they can potentially help to prevent problems in the future.

Through a series of experimental papers published over the last five years, we can understand exactly how hops help. In 2008, a team from Osaka University unveiled a group of chemicals known as polyphenols, which are known to help prevent oral cancer. Based on their experiments, these compounds stopped inflammation and kept gums pink instead of red. In the same year, a team from Nippon Dental University revealed the molecules also halted the development of dental plaque. By 2013, xanthohumol also proved to keep teeth happy and healthy by ensuring that bacteria could not stick to the teeth and gums.

Considering the benefit of the hop flower, there was every reason to believe there was more to the Humulus story. The focus was on the leaves of the hop flower, known as bracts. In the brewing process, bracts tend to be discarded as they do not impart much to the quality of the beer. But in 2007, a team from Tokyo Medical and Dental University demonstrated that bract extract could not only prevent but also removeplaque from teeth. Considering the extracts were safe, there was every indication to believe that incorporating bracts into beer might be an option for better teeth.

This week, a Japanese team of investigators gave some of the most compelling evidence to prove this theory. Although their work was chemical, not medicinal or dental in nature, their results have all but confirmed that bracts are all that and more. Moreover, they have shown the beer brewery may be the best place to find the future of healthy teeth.

Looking closer at the paper, the tack was routine for any physical chemistry experiment. Bract extracts were taken back to the lab and racked for assessment of their beneficial knack. The results left the researchers jacked as there was no lack of known orally-beneficial compounds, stacking up to twenty in all. The pack also included others yet to crack the market but showed health potential based on evidence not quacks.

Thanks to this study, there is little doubt of the potential benefit of bracts. This may lead to a new range of natural oral products providing not only a greener alternative to modern day toothpaste, but also a more effective means to prevent gum disease.There is another perhaps less obvious benefit. Focusing on the leaves will also ensure no competition between beer and dental industries. While the flowers will still go to the breweries to keep our glasses full, the leaves will head to health manufacturers who will help to keep our teeth healthy. All said, that is surely a blessing even St. Patrick would approve.

 

Article from: http://bit.ly/2vNzH5i

When It Comes to Oral Health, We Can Learn Something from the Beavers

By Youth Health

 

When it comes to understanding tooth decay, a group of researchers is saying, “Leave it to beavers.”

Researchers from Northwestern University have discovered something remarkable about the oral health of beavers, the semi-aquatic rodents that are known for their building skills and strong set of teeth.

These furry creatures certainly don’t enjoy the same conveniences humans have as far as taking care of their oral health is concerned. But unlike us, they don’t develop tooth decay.

The answer, it turns out, is the presence of iron in the enamel.

The enamel is one of the tissues that make up the teeth of humans and many animals including beavers. They are also the most visible parts-see the whites in your teeth?-and are made to be resistant to acids. Acid build-up happens based on the food a person eats. When there’s too much acid, it “dissolves” the enamel, making the teeth more sensitive and at risk of developing cavities.

The main composition of enamel is hydroxylapatite, which looks like nanowires. Surrounding it are magnesium and iron, both amorphous minerals. When the enamel tries to protect the teeth from acid deterioration, it’s not the nanowires that respond but these minerals. As the researchers put it, we do share a similar enamel structure but not composition with the beavers and perhaps other animals, and the difference in composition may help determine the degree of acid resistance of enamels.

In their study, the researchers looked into enamel of three animals including rabbits and beavers and analyzed the enamel’s amorphous structure using tomography.

They then exposed the enamel to acid while taking before-and-after images, then noticed that the nanowires remained but the surrounding minerals dissolved. Subsequently the team analyzed how these minerals help in increasing the enamel’s resistance and hardness and discovered that the incisors of beavers are pigmented and rich in iron, making it a much better enamel than one that’s treated with fluoride.

With this knowledge, the research may be helpful in gaining a better understanding of oral health, especially how tooth decay develops.

The entire research is available in Frontiers in Psychology journal.

 

Article from: http://bit.ly/1yCd2IK