Your teens may think that they don’t need you anymore, but they’ll always need their teeth!

By: Campaign for Dental Health, American Academy of Pediatrics

Your teens may think that they don’t need you anymore, but they’ll always need their teeth!

They will thank you for setting the foundation for good oral health by modeling the best practices and having them see a dentist regularly. Read more here! If you need help finding a dentist for your teen visit:https://buff.ly/2wPkIaH  The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Do you remember chasing your toddler around trying to brush his teeth before bed? You may not have to do that anymore, but oral health is as important for adolescents as it was when they were little, maybe even more so. During adolescence, we want to be sure that children continue effective oral hygiene habits such as brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste, flossing, seeing a dentist, eating a healthy diet that is low in sugar, and drinking water with fluoride.

Adolescents also have other things to consider when it comes to their oral health such as using tobacco or marijuana productsdealing with braces, using mouth guards while playing sports, and all of the changes that are happening with their bodies. They will continue to need your guidance in making decisions that affect their overall health and oral health, but it is also time for them to take the wheel to make sure they have teeth for life. Good oral health is important for getting a job and a girlfriend/boyfriend – you can decide which message works better for your teen!

They will thank you for setting the foundation for good oral health by modeling best practices, having your child see a dentist regularly, and making sure he had all of the needed preventive treatments, such as sealants, fluoride applications, orthodontics, and fillings, when needed. If you need help finding a dentist for your teen visit https://www.insurekidsnow.gov/state/find-a-dentist/index.html.

Article Source: https://ilikemyteeth.org/teens-may-think-dont-need-anymore-theyll-always-need-teeth/

 

New Implant Advancement Hopes to Lower Risk of Infection

By: KU Leuven, Oral Health Group

😀 New research has developed a dental implant that can gradually release drugs from a built-in reservoir which helps prevent and fight infections:

Visit our website to learn more about dental implants: http://buff.ly/2eYfjKE. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

A multidisciplinary team of researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven, Belgium) has developed a dental implant that gradually releases drugs from a built-in reservoir. This helps prevent and fight infections.

Our mouth contains many micro-organisms, including bacterial and fungal pathogens. On traditional dental implants, these pathogens can quickly form a so-called biofilm, which is resistant to antimicrobial drugs like antibiotics. As a result, these implants come with a significant risk of infections that may be difficult to treat.

KU Leuven researchers have now developed a new dental implant that reduces the risk of infections. “Our implant has a built-in reservoir underneath the crown of the tooth,” explains lead author Kaat De Cremer. “A cover screw makes it easy to fill this reservoir with antimicrobial drugs (see image 1). The implant is made of a porous composite material so that the drugs gradually diffuse from the reservoir to the outside of the implant, which is in direct contact with the bone cells (see image 2). As a result, the bacteria can no longer form a biofilm.”

To view the full story, please click here.

Article from: https://www.oralhealthgroup.com/news/new-implant-advancement-hopes-lower-risk-infection-1003926159/

 

 

The Evolution of the Toothbrush

By: Irma Wallace, Infographic Journal

[INFOGRAPHIC] 🐴 Can you imagine brushing your teeth with horsehair?! Take a look at just how far the toothbrush has come. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Attention to dental hygiene dates all the way back to 3500 BCE with the Chew Stick in Egypt and Babylonia. Centuries later, we have seen tremendous advances in the dental hygiene industry. Check out this Evolution of the Toothbrush by Fortis to understand the incredible transformation of the dental hygiene industry from 3500 BCE until today.

[Click here for full size version]

 

Article from: http://buff.ly/2f5YJE0

Can You Get Through This Post Without Wanting To Brush Your Teeth?

By: Kelly Oakes, BuzzFeed

😏 CHALLENGE: Try getting through this disturbing article without wanting to brush your teeth! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Here’s what your teeth look like up close and personal with a scanning electron microscope.

This is a calcium phosphate crystal, the stuff that makes up your tooth enamel.

Here’s some plaque-forming bacteria, magnified 1000 times. It really likes to hang out on your teeth.

See: here’s the surface of a human tooth. Bacteria are colored blue, red blood cells are red.

When you let the bacteria stick around, plaque starts to form.

Brushing can keep the plaque at bay. This is a single bristle from a used toothbrush.

And another.

Here’s the bristles of an interdental brush covered in plaque.

Some more of that lovely plaque-forming bacteria that forms on your teeth. Super cute and cuddly!

It just wants to be your friend.

It just wants to be your friend.

Look away now if you’re squeamish. This is a tooth with a cavity.

And don’t forget about your gums. These are the bacteria that live in them.

Brb brushing my teeth.

Article from: http://buff.ly/2h8g9jG

New material used in molar extraction sites optimizes bone regeneration and dental implant stability

By: Journal of Oral Implantology

🤓 [Good to know]: New material used in molar extraction sites optimizes bone regeneration and dental implant stability. Curious to learn more? The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Journal of Oral Implantology – Dental surgery is a difficult, painful process no matter what the procedure, but having a tooth extracted and an implant put in months later can result in major complications. The longer you wait for the implant, the greater the likelihood that formation of scar tissue or shifting of teeth will occur to compensate for the loss of the extracted tooth; this can cause problems when it is time to insert the new implant.

Great advancements in dental surgery have been made to assist with bone and tissue regeneration so that when it is time to insert the implant, the extraction site has been stabilized and a graft performed to protect the integrity of the site. The article “Guided Bone Regeneration for Socket Preservation in Molar Extraction Sites: Histomorphometric and 3D Computerized Tomography Analysis” in the Journal of Oral Implantology introduces a new, more advanced method for this regeneration that prevents infection and maximizes bone regeneration.

The most commonly used treatment for post-extraction regeneration has been a combination of acellular dermis matrix (ADM), a type of bone regenerating material that uses cadaveric tissue with all of the cells removed, and different grafting procedures. However, there has been no solid histologic data or microscopic tissue samples to prove that this regeneration is working properly.

This case series examines a new ADM replacement material called decellularized dermis matrix (DDM) that, combined with mineralized bone grafts called mineralized cancellous bone allograft (MCAB), guides the regeneration of bone to allow for a more stable placement of the implant. This method has a higher regeneration percentage and supports a more stable future implant site than previous therapies.

Tissue samples were examined both microscopically and using 3D imaging. Valuable surgery preparation time was saved using DDM, which can be stored fully hydrated, and the material was easy to handle and adapted well to the shape of extraction-site defects. A minimum of 12 weeks post extraction, the study found that none of the molar extractions had developed infections. A loss of bone volume was also prevented, allowing for optimal implant placement and stability. These results demonstrate the value of DDM and MCAB in preparing molar extraction sites to support implant placement.

Full text of the article, “Guided Bone Regeneration for Socket Preservation in Molar Extraction Sites: Histomorphometric and 3D Computerized Tomography Analysis,” Journal of Oral Implantology, Vol. 39, No. 4, 2013, is available here.

Article from: http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/09/new-material-used-in-molar-extraction-sites-optimizes-bone-regeneration-and-dental-implant-stability.html

The complete guide to great oral health

By: Southcommon Dental

😬 Besides brushing, here are other important steps to maintain great oral health. Check out the complete guide here. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Take a moment to think about your own oral health. It’s something which far too many of us often overlook but this shouldn’t be the case. Developing and maintaining good oral health and hygiene doesn’t have to be expensive, time-consuming or difficult but can lead to so many worthwhile benefits for the mouth and our overall wellbeing.

To keep your mouth healthy and your smile beautiful, the team at Southcommon Dental have put together their Complete Guide to Oral Hygiene.

Simply follow these four steps and you will be on your way to a life of good oral hygiene….

Brushing

Regularly and thoroughly brushing your teeth is an important step in preventing tooth decay and gum disease. When you brush your teeth, you remove the bacteria that promote tooth decay and the plaque that can cause gum disease.

How to brush your teeth

  • Angle your brush at 45 degrees relative to where your gums and teeth meet. Brush up and down with a gentle and circular massaging motion. Don’t scrub your teeth as gums that recede are often a result of years of brushing too hard.
  • Clean the entire surface of every tooth. Make sure you get the chewing surface, the cheek side, and the tongue side.
  • Don’t rush the process. A thorough cleaning should take at least two minutes. Time yourself occasionally to make sure you are meeting the mark.
  • Pick a soft brush with rounded bristles. The exact size and shape should let you reach the teeth at the very back of your mouth. There are many different types of brushes, so ask your dentist to suggest the best one for you.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three months.

Interdental cleaning

Interdental cleaning removes plaque and bacteria that cannot be reached with tooth brushing alone. If you don’t regularly clean between your teeth you are missing more than one-third of your tooth surfaces, this allows plaque to build up.

Clean between your teeth at least once a day, either with dental floss or tape, interdental brushes or an electric water flosser, to ensure that plaque never gets the chance to harden into tartar.

  • Hold the interdental brush between your thumb and forefinger. Gently place the brush through the gap between your teeth.
  • Do not force the brush head through the gap. If the brush splays or bends then it is too big – a smaller brush head will be needed.
  • Interdental brushes come in various sizes. It may be helpful to ask your dentist or hygienist to show you the correct sizes for your mouth.

Avoid certain substances

  • Harmful oral bacteria feeds on sugar. By reducing sugar intake, you can reduce the amount of bacteria in your mouth. If you insist on eating sugary foods, try to keep it to mealtimes and do not brush immediately after.
  • Be wary of acidic foods and drinks. Acid strips tooth enamel of its minerals. Over time, enamel damage leaves the sensitive interior structure of teeth unprotected against cavity-causing bacteria.
  • Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to irritations of the tissues inside the mouth, including the tongue and slower healing and poor healing after dental or oral surgery.
  • Smoking also has harmful effects on your teeth. When you smoke, you interfere with the normal function of gum tissue cells and affect the attachment of bone and soft tissue to your teeth. This leaves you more susceptible to infections and impairs blood flow to the gums.

Visit your dentist regularly

  • The body naturally builds up plaque and calculus and if it’s not removed, it embeds underneath the gum tissues and quietly causes periodontal disease. It doesn’t hurt but it silently produces enzymes that dissolve away the bones.
  • A little cavity can be managed with a simple filling. A big cavity becomes a big problem. In its biggest stage, it can cause suffering and swelling but also the loss of a tooth. Regular checkups with your dentist allow you to catch cavities before they turn into big problems.
  • There is a strong correlation between gum disease and heart disease. Sugar and starch on the teeth produce billions of bacteria that end up in the bloodstream. While bacteria normally exist in the mouth, gum disease increases the level of bacteria dramatically and it gets carried through the blood and can end up lodged in the heart and clog blood vessels.

Article from: https://www.dentalhealth.org/blog/blogdetails/190

An Easy Recipe for A Happy and Healthy Childhood

 

By: ilikemyteeth.org

😆 It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3! Help your children stay away from pain from dental caries or abscessed teeth, give your children a happy and healthy childhood. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Wouldn’t it be great if children came with a recipe to make sure that they grow up happy and healthy? We know it isn’t that simple, but generally, there are three ingredients we all want for kids – Laugh, Play, and Smile. Now take a minute to think about how you laugh, play, or smile when your mouth is in pain. Do you feel like going to play a game of basketball or hang out with your friends when your mouth hurts? Do you feel happy? Healthy?

Oral health is often overlooked in childhood. Since baby teeth fall out, many parents don’t understand why they should make the investment to care for them. The reason is simple, because children who don’t have healthy teeth, who suffer in pain from dental caries or even abscessed teeth, aren’t able to laugh, play, and smile. And without these things they don’t get to enjoy a happy and healthy childhood.

For more information on how to make sure your children are able to enjoy a lifetime of good oral health visit your doctor and dentist, use fluoride, and get more tips from healthychildren.org.

We encourage you to download the following shareable image for use on social media channels. Thank you for sharing!

Watch these!

Article from: http://buff.ly/2tOHFtz

5 FOODS FOR HEALTHIER GUMS

By: Listerine

🐮 Beyond just limiting the sugary sweets and harsh acidic foods in your diet, incorporate foods that are good for your gums, too! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Routine brushing, flossing, and rinsing keep your mouth in good health. And while you need these powerful weapons in your bacteria-fighting arsenal, you could always use reinforcement. Beyond limiting the sugary sweets and harsh acidic foods in your diet, there are foods that are good for your gums.

A Better Way to Add Flavor

Ginger root is considered a healing herb. With its anti-inflammatory properties, ginger promotes healthy tissue in your mouth.

Keep More Than the Doctor Away

Eating an apple can take a while. And that’s a good thing for your mouth. The munching action spurs a cleansing action that shakes up the plaque that clings to gums and teeth. Stock up on apples, but be sure to rinse with mouthwash afterward. Even healthy foods like apples can expose your mouth to acids.

Got Milk in Your Diet?

Milk and other dairy foods such as cheese and yogurt are not only packed with bone-fortifying calcium, but also with the protein casein, which research suggests reduce acid levels in the mouth. In addition, drinking milk can neutralize acids produced by plaque bacteria. Note: Drinking milk with cereal or dessert doesn’t have the same benefit as direct consumption after eating. No milk around? Eat a piece of cheese instead.

Load Up on Leafy Greens

It’s no secret that salad greens pack an all-around healthy punch, but they’re also especially successful at keeping mouths clean because they’re fiber-packed, meaning they require serious chewing to break down. The extra saliva produced by chewing neutralizes mouth bacteria. High-fiber, stringy foods like raw spinach, celery, and even cooked beans offer this benefit.

Zap Bacteria, Layer by Layer

The raw onion is a potent bacteria-fighting food. Yes, bad breath is the enemy. But that’s why sugarless gum and mouthwash were created. Onions have an antimicrobial ingredient that kills bacteria, and, according to one study, completely wipes out four bacteria strains that lead to gum disease and cavities. Sliver them and toss the strips in your salad, on your sandwich and burger or in soups and stews.

Article from: https://www.listerine.com/gum-disease-healthy-gums/foods-healthier-gums

A Year of Oral Health Guidance in Review

By David Cavano, Dental Health

🏖 Summer is here! Here’s some oral health guidance from the past year to help you understand what new information is available and which tried-and-true practices still stand. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Sometimes it is hard to keep up with all of the new guidance about our health. What we were told yesterday is healthy, is now unhealthy today. Here, I have distilled down some of the oral health guidance from the past year so you can understand what new information is available and which tried-and-true practices still stand.

Toss Teething Tablets

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned against the use of homeopathic teething tabs and drops that contain belladonna. An FDA Press Release instructed consumers not to use Hyland’s teething products and to dispose of any in their possession. Hyland’s Teething Tablets are manufactured to contain a small amount of belladonna, a substance that can cause serious harm at larger doses. FDA laboratory analysis has discovered that Hyland’s Teething Tablets contain inconsistent amounts of belladonna.

Safe teething relief strategies to try: Gently message areas near erupting teeth using a clean finger. Cool objects may provide relief, so consider chilled (not frozen) wash cloths, a semi-frozen banana or a commercial teething ring. Make certain teething rings are of one-piece construction, free of painted surfaces, and sufficiently large to avoid choking.

Weigh the Risks and Benefits of General Anesthesia and Sedation Drug Use in Children

In January 2017, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) responded to the  FDA warning on general anesthesia and sedation drug use in children. This warning includes the possibility of developmental problems associated with repeated or prolonged use of anesthetics in children younger than 3 years of age. The FDA advisory committee has been reporting about the concerns regarding anesthesia in young children since 2007 and aims to increase awareness in providers enabling the provision of education for families and subsequent informed consent.

Section and AAP Leadership worked together, along with several other societies, to form a response to this warning. These groups have reviewed recent controlled trials in humans as well as multiple epidemiological studies of large populations that demonstrate no developmental problems in children exposed to a single, short anesthetic or sedation. The response cautions parents and providers of the risks of delaying needed surgery and diagnostic procedures and suggests weighing the risks and benefits of each contemplated procedure.

Use Fluoride Toothpaste in Young Children

The AAP, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), and the American Dental Association (ADA) all agree that fluoride toothpaste should be used for all children, regardless of age. Upon arrival of the first primary tooth, parents should begin using a grain-of-rice sized amount of fluoridated toothpaste regardless of both water fluoride content and cavities risk status. Brushing is advised twice daily, ideally after a morning meal and always prior to bedtime.

Use Toothpaste to Deliver Fluoride, Not to Remove Plaque

December 2016 Journal of Clinical Periodontology. Toothpaste does not provide an added effect for the mechanical removal of dental plaque. However, toothpaste use should continue as it promotes oral health as a delivery system for fluoride and antimicrobials.

All Children Should Receive Fluoride Varnish Application

All children, regardless of risk may receive fluoride varnish applications in the primary care setting. The frequency of application is dependent upon the compliance with the use of a dental home as well as cavities-risk.

Recent studies published in the September 2016 Journal of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistrycontinue to demonstrate the safety of fluoride varnish, concluding that biannual fluoride varnish application in preschoolers is not associated with the occurrence of any level of fluorosis in permanent maxillary incisors.

Drink Water with Fluoride

In 2017, community water fluoridation programs continue to be the most effective and affordable way to prevent dental caries in children and adults. Although there were no new recommendations this year, we must all continue to advocate for this practice and recommend that our patients and their families drink water with fluoride for cavity-protection.

While the above is not a comprehensive listing of all professional guidance around oral health, they may well be the most important messages to share during National Children’s Dental Health Month and throughout the year.

Article from: http://buff.ly/2wbHHMZ

Consider the Evidence: Fluoride For Healthy Futures

By: Mirissa D. Price, Huffington Contributor

[OPINION]: Fluoride represents a major step toward not just treatment, but also prevention in oral health. Fluoride for healthy futures! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

On February 1, 2016, in the late hours of the night, my jaw fell to the floor. I just couldn’t believe what I was seeing: 

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And I truly hoped that none of the viewers would believe what they were seeing, either. Because it wasn’t based on evidence – not the kind prefaced by the word ‘science.’

And though a year has gone by since this Dr. Oz episode aired, I just couldn’t let the date pass without a call to action. To all readers, to all viewers, to you Ms. Brockovich, and you Dr. Oz, I don’t ask that you change your mind. Not necessarily. But I do ask that you read this statement drafted with a number of my HSDM 2019 DMD Candidate colleagues, and consider the evidence – the scientific evidence. Because, as a 2019 DMD Candidate at Harvard School of Dental Medicine and a future pediatric dentist, I care about your health today and in the future; I care about our communities’ health, and the health of our children, and I care that we make the right choices for everyone today. So, for just a moment, consider . . .

Harvard School of Dental Medicine practices dentistry under a philosophy of evidence-based medicine, providing patients with an up-to-date and research-based quality of care. Unfortunately, the antifluoridation segment on the Dr. Oz show on February 1, 2016, left much to be wanted regarding evidence-based care. In a one-sided depiction of Erin Brockovich’s anti-fluoridation rhetoric, this episode gravely misrepresented the strong foundation of research in support of community water fluoridation. In doing so, this episode not only threatened a public health measure supported by over one hundred health organizations, including the American Association of Public Health Dentistry and American Dental Association, but threatened the oral health and wellbeing of the most vulnerable communities in our nation.

Community water fluoridation took root in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1945. Soon, with a capacity to flow beyond the barriers to care dividing our society, community water fluoridation flourished as one of the greatest public health achievements of the twentieth century. Though only 37% of adults will actually visit a dentist in a given year, as of 2012, 200 million people in the United States received service from fluoridated water systems. These 200 million individuals thus had access to not only the remineralizing benefits of fluoride at the tooth surface and corresponding reduction in dental caries, but the associated increase in life satisfaction, employment success, and social confidence.

Unfortunately, Erin Brockovich, an environmental activist, misrepresented the impact of fluoride. She alluded to health risks of fluoride toxicity, citing the decreasing fluoride concentration in water from 1.2 to 0.7 mg/L as evidence of her claims. She further instilled fear in products vital to sustained oral health, including fluoridated toothpaste and natural foods. However, Ms. Brockovich failed to mention that the established safe fluoride levels are less than one-half the Maximum Concentration Limit, and all created within standards of the American Water Works Association and NSF International. Further, she fell short in factually supporting her claims of grandeur, misrepresenting the prevalence of dental fluorosis when this condition, in severe state, only presents in fewer than 1% of the population. The evidence in favor of fluoride is of such strength that even pediatricians are seeking to provide topical fluoride application in the pediatric medical home.

Fluoride represents a major step towards not just treatment but prevention in oral health. The use of fluoridated toothpaste and community water fluoridation has reduced the prevalence of dental caries from 90 to 30% among those age 12-17 years since the 1960s. Caries in adults have also seen significant decline since the introduction of community water fluoridation from 18 affected teeth on average among 35-44 year old adults in the 1960s to 10 affected teeth on average among 35-49 year olds in 1999-2004. As Americans are living longer, so, too, must our teeth, and scientific evidence overwhelmingly concurs that community water fluoridation is a vital component to sustaining our oral health and quality of life.

Thus, with respect for all voices and concern, the dental-medical community asks that the Dr. Oz Show and its viewers consider the scientific evidence in support of community water fluoridation as a strong and guiding voice of its own. Our choices today regarding community water fluoridation most certainly will affect the oral health and quality of life for our children tomorrow.

This statement was drafted as a collaboration of 2019 DMD Candidates at Harvard School of Dental Medicine as part of the Global and Public Health Curriculum, and does not represent an official response statement of HSDM.

Specific contribution is attributed to Jacquelyn Chou, 2019 DMD Candidate Harvard School of Dental Medicine; Justin Montenegro, 2019 DMD Candidate, Harvard School of Dental Medicine; Deepti Shroff, 2019 DMD Candidate, Harvard School of Dental Medicine; Edirin Sido, 2019 DMD Candidate, Harvard School of Dental Medicine; Mirissa D. Price, 2019 DMD Candidate, Harvard School of Dental Medicine; and additional 2019 DMD Candidates at Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

—-

The doctor said she would live in a nursing home, confined to a wheelchair, crippled by pain; that was thirteen years ago. Instead, Mirissa D. Price is a 2019 DMD candidate at Harvard School of Dental Medicine, spreading pain-free smiles, writing through her nights, and, once again, walking through her days.

Article from: http://buff.ly/2vjiBiK