Wisdom Teeth Removal: What Adults Should Expect

 

By: WebMD

 

😁 Knowing the things you should expect from your tooth extraction procedure is one effective way to get prepared. Each step matters to achieve a better dental experience! Read more about what to expect! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Your dentist says it’s time to remove your wisdom teeth. He may refer you to an oral surgeon, who will do the procedure in his office. It should only take a few days for you to heal and feel back to normal.

Why Take Them Out?

Wisdom teeth are a third set of molars in the back of your mouth. They usually come in between the ages of 17 and 25, and they’re spotted on X-rays. Most people have them removed for one of these reasons:

  • They’re impacted. Because they’re so far back in your mouth, wisdom teeth may not come in normally. They can be trapped in your jawbone or gums, which can be painful.
  • They come in at the wrong angle. They may press against your other teeth.
  • Your mouth isn’t big enough. Your jaw has no room for an extra set of molars.
  • You have cavities or gum disease. You may not be able to reach your wisdom teeth with your toothbrush or dental floss.

Before Surgery

  • wisdom teeth with your toothbrush or dental floss.

Before Surgery

You’ll meet with the oral surgeon to talk about the process. At this appointment, make sure you:

  • Talk about any health problems you have.
  • List any drugs you take on a regular basis.
  • Ask any questions you have about the surgery.
  • Discuss what type of anesthesia you’ll have. You can either be numb or asleep during your surgery.
  • Plan time off from work or school to have your surgery and rest afterward at home. Set up child care, pet care, or a ride home if needed.

During Surgery

Your surgery should take 45 minutes or less.

You’ll get one of these types of anesthesia so you don’t feel pain during the removal:

  • Local: Your doctor will numb your mouth with a shot of Novocaine in your gums.You may also breathe nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, to relax or even doze during surgery. You should feel alert again shortly afterward.
  • IV sedation: The surgeon will numb your mouth and also give you drugs through a vein in your arm to make you drowsy. You might sleepduring the whole procedure.
  • General: You’ll either get drugs through a vein or breathe gas in through a mask. You’ll be asleep the whole time and might not wake up for an hour or so after the surgery.

Your doctor may have to cut your gums or bone to get the teeth out. If so, he’ll stitch the wounds shut so they heal quickly. These stitches usually dissolve after a few days. He may also stuff gauze pads in your mouth to soak up some of the blood.

 

Source: https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/wisdom-teeth-adult?

Soda After Wisdom Teeth Removal

By: Brynne Chandler, Livestrong

 

😷 Diarrhea may occur after the wisdom tooth extraction, however, this is preventable. Check out these foods recommended to manage this condition. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Wisdom teeth, which are also called third molars, generally grow in at the very back of your mouth when you are between the ages of 15 and 25. According to the researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center, most peoples’ mouths are too small to fit four extra teeth. This can cause crowding, pain, infection, and swelling, leading most dentists to extract wisdom teeth. Wisdom tooth extraction is minor surgery and requires careful aftercare for proper healing. Drinking carbonated soda just after having your wisdom teeth pulled can lead to problems.

Soda

The first carbonated sodas were made from naturally carbonated water. In 1772, British scientist Joseph Priestly dripped sulfuric acid onto chalk. The result was carbon dioxide, which makes the bubbles in your soda. Most sodas also contain large amounts of sugar, which can lead to tooth decay, and sodium, which is very drying to the tissues inside of your mouth.

Extraction

Wisdom tooth extraction is usually performed under a general anesthetic, though many dentists and oral surgeons offer conscious sedation. This means that you can’t feel anything, but are still awake. Wisdom teeth that have already erupted through your gums are pulled out with dental pliers, while extracting them before they erupt may involve cutting open your gum tissue to free the tooth. Either way, the entire tooth is removed, leaving an empty socket.

Aftercare

The University of Oregon Health Center advises that you keep a gentle pressure on the gauze that will be packed into your tooth socket to control bleeding so that the socket can form a clot. Avoid brushing your teeth or rinsing your mouth out for at least 24 hours after the extraction, and avoid very hot or cold drinks–including sodas–and solid foods. The Consumer Guide to Dentistry recommends that you avoid soft drinks because the bubbles caused by the carbonation can dislodge the blood clot that needs to form in order for the tooth socket to heal.

Misconceptions

Drinking through a straw may seem like a good idea after tooth extraction, but the suction needed to draw the liquid up through the straw can dislodge blood clots. Drinking soda through a straw will also not reduce the amount of bubbles, or keep them away from the extraction sites.

Warning

Dislodging a blood clot before it forms completely causes alveolar osteitis, or dry socket. The absence of the blood clot before the bone and gum tissue has a chance to heal and replace it exposes your bone to the air, and to anything that you put into your mouth. The pain this causes is too severe to be treated with over-the-counter pain relievers and requires medical attention from your doctor or oral surgeon.