Christmas Foods to Avoid for Fresh Breath

By: Capitol Hill Times

🎉 The holidays bring lots of good food, drink, and socializing, but sometimes the conversations may be short due to what you’re eating.

Dr. Harold Katz, developer of the TheraBreath line of oral products and widely recognized as “America’s Bad Breath Doctor” says there are certain holiday foods to avoid – if you don’t want to be avoided on New Year’s! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

If you wonder why people keep a safe distance during these festive occasions, it might be because of your bad breath. Some of the traditional dishes and beverages America enjoys at family gatherings and office parties are the main culprits.

“Some of the most popular holiday foods can really stink up your mouth, which is especially lethal at a loud gathering when you have to lean in close to have conversations,” says Dr. Katz, who is also a dentist and bacteriologist. Bad breath bacteria react immediately to changes in the oral environment and unfortunately many Holiday foods provide the fuel which they convert into Volatile Sulfur Compounds, including Hydrogen Sulfide (the rotten egg smell).

Dr. Katz says these are some of the worst holiday foods in terms of causing bad breath:a

Alcohol: Chemically, it’s a dehydrating agent – and dry mouth is one of the leading causes of bad breath. Furthermore, many old-fashioned mouthwash formulas contain high concentrations of alcohol which may exacerbate your dry mouth. Look for alcohol-free oxygenating oral products instead.

Ham: Ham is not only high in protein, but the way it’s prepared (salted, cured, smoked) also leads to dry mouth.

Garlic and onions: Already loaded with smelly sulfur compounds.

Wine and cheese: This classic party snack packs a double bad-breath wallop: the wine is dehydrating, and the cheese is rich in proteins, easily converted into sour milk odors.

Cranberry sauce: If it’s loaded with sugar, as most canned cranberry sauces are, it’s going to be no better for your teeth (and your breath) than a slice of cake.

Dr. Katz says since holidays are a time of close personal contact with large groups of people, it would be prudent for people to at least know which foods cause the worst bad breath.

Source: https://www.capitolhilltimes.com/2018/12/18/christmas-foods-to-avoid-for-fresh-breath/


Removing plaque and tartar from teeth

By: Jamie Eske, Medical News Today

The buildup of plaque tartar on the teeth can cause bad breath, tooth decay, and gum disease. However, several simple home remedies can help treat and prevent plaque and tartar. Learn them via Medical News Today! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Plaque is a soft, sticky film that builds up on the outside of the teeth and along the gum line. A person can often prevent and treat plaque buildup at home. If a person does not practice good dental hygiene, plaque can turn into a hard yellow-brown substance called tartar.

When people eat, bacteria in the mouth breakdown the carbohydrates from food into acid, which mixes with leftover food particles and saliva to create plaque.

Brushing and flossing often prevent plaque and tartar from forming. However, tartar can be more difficult to remove and sometimes requires a visit to the dentist’s office for a professional cleaning.

Poor oral hygiene can also cause bad breath, tooth decay, and gum disease (gingivitis). Recent research has also uncovered possible associations between gum disease and other health conditions, including pneumoniadementia, and heart disease.

In this article, learn about simple ways to remove plaque and prevent tartar buildup at home.

Practicing good oral hygiene

Practicing good oral hygiene is the best way to remove plaque and tartar. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommend brushing twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste. They also recommend flossing once a day.

Flossing first will remove pieces of food and plaque from between the teeth and hard-to-reach areas. After flossing, the toothbrush will remove plaque on the surface of the teeth.

To brush the teeth effectively, a person can:

  1. Start in the back of the mouth with the top molars.
  2. Use short, circular brush strokes.
  3. Brush the front and back surfaces of all the upper teeth.
  4. Repeat steps 1–3 on the bottom teeth.

People can achieve great results using manual toothbrushes. However, a 2014 systematic reviewfound that electric toothbrushes, especially those with oscillating heads, are more effective at removing plaque and reducing gingivitis.

After flossing and brushing the teeth, rinse out the mouth with mouthwash. Many over-the-counter mouthwashes contain fluoride for extra protection against plaque.

People who have gingivitis may require a stronger type of mouthwash. A dentist or another healthcare provider can prescribe antiseptic mouthwashes that are more potent than those available over the counter.

Brushing with baking soda

Brushing with baking soda is a safe and effective way to remove plaque. Baking soda can remove plaque without damaging the enamel.

Studies suggest that toothpaste that contains baking soda may be more effective at reducing the amount of plaque in the mouth than traditional toothpaste.

Baking soda also protects against demineralization, which is a chemical process that removes calcium from tooth enamel.

Carbohydrates from food can drastically lower the pH level in the mouth, creating an acidic environment that causes demineralization.

Scientists measure the acidity of a substance using the pH scale. The lower the pH, the more acidic the substance.

The lower limit for enamel pH ranges between 5.1 and 5.5. When the pH drops below this range, demineralization begins to occur.

Baking soda reduces demineralization because it has a high pH, which can help balance the pH level inside the mouth and prevent enamel loss.

The mouth is home to a diverse ecosystem of bacteria, some of which are beneficial while others can be harmful. Streptococcus mutans, for example, is the bacteria primarily responsible for tooth decay.

Baking soda also has antimicrobial properties that may prevent tooth decay. Research suggests that baking soda can significantly reduce the amount of S. mutans.

People can find baking soda in many grocery stores and online.

Oil pulling with coconut oil

Oil pulling is an easy way to remove bacteria from the mouth and improve oral health.

Coconut oil is ideal for oil pulling because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Coconut oil also contains lauric acid, a fatty acid with antimicrobial properties.

2015 study involving 60 adolescents with gingivitis found that oil pulling with coconut oil resulted in a 50 percent decrease in dental plaque.

The study participants also experienced a significant decrease in gingivitis symptoms. The researchers believe this was due to the reduction in dental plaque.

To oil pull, a person should:

  1. Place 1 tablespoon of warm coconut oil in the mouth.
  2. Swish the coconut oil around the mouth for 5–10 minutes.
  3. Spit out the coconut oil into a trash can or a paper towel.

A person should avoid spitting the coconut oil into the sink, as it may clog the pipes.

Coconut oil is available for purchase in some health food stores and online.

Other effective oils for oil pulling include:

  • olive oil
  • almond oil
  • sesame oil

Prevention

The best way to prevent the buildup of plaque and tartar on the teeth is by flossing once a day and brushing twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste.

Regular dental checkups and professional cleanings can also help prevent and treat oral health problems.

Dentists examine the whole mouth, checking for signs of tooth decay and gum disease. They will also remove any plaque or tartar on the surface of the teeth and in difficult-to-reach places. Dentists can also treat the teeth with fluoride to help prevent tooth decay.

If a dentist notices any cavities or signs of gum inflammation, they will recommend ways to reduce symptoms and prevent further damage. They may prescribe medical mouthwash or suggest adjusting a person’s oral hygiene routine.

Dietary changes can also help prevent plaque and tartar buildup. Cutting back on sugar, starch, and acidic foods can reduce the risk of tooth decay.

To reduce the risk of plaque and tartar, a person should avoid:

  • cookies, cake, and candy
  • starchy or sugary foods that can stick to the teeth, such as bread, potato chips, and some dried fruits
  • soda and sports drinks
  • citrus juices

Summary

The buildup of plaque and tartar on the teeth can lead to gum disease, enamel loss, and tooth decay.

Poor oral hygiene may also play a role in the development of other health conditions.

Brushing twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste and flossing once daily are the best ways to remove plaque from teeth and prevent tartar from forming.

Other home remedies that can remove plaque include oil pulling and brushing the teeth with baking soda.

Visiting a dentist for regular checkups and cleanings is another essential step for maintaining good oral hygiene.

For people with an excessive plaque or severe gum disease, a dentist may also recommend prescription-strength mouthwashes or changes to the person’s oral care routine.

Source: bit.ly/plaquetartar

What can cause gum pain?

By: Rachel Nall RN MSN, Medical News Today

The gums are soft, fleshy tissue that supports and protects the teeth. Gum pain can be a sign of irritation, infection, or injury to the gums and teeth.

Medical News Today discussed some of the possible causes of gum pain, treatment, home remedies, prevention, and when to see us! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Causes

Gum pain can range from a minor irritation to severe and debilitating. Some potential causes of gum pain include:

  • Canker sores: These are small, painful ulcers that can occur on the gums. Causes of canker sores can include emotional stress, mouth injuries, an impaired immune system, or other underlying health conditions.
  • Cuts or injuries: Food and objects that enter the mouth can sometimes cause minor cuts or injuries to the gums and teeth. A person may also accidentally bite down on the gums, which can sometimes cause pain and bleeding.
  • Gum disease: Also known as gingivitis, this condition occurs when bacteria build up under the gums and cause inflammation and bleeding. Without treatment, gingivitis can develop into periodontitis and lead to loose teeth. People who smoke are at a higher risk for gum disease than nonsmokers.
  • Hormonal changes: Hormonal fluctuations, especially during pregnancy, can cause a person to experience swelling, pain, and bleeding in the gums.
  • Improper flossing or brushing techniques: Brushing or flossing too vigorously or frequently can sometimes cause the gums to bleed and be painful.
  • Sinusitis: A bacterial or viral infection in the sinuses can cause swelling of the sinus cavity. Some people with sinusitis also experience gum pain and toothache.
  • Tooth abscess: A bacterial infection in the root of a tooth can cause an abscess or pus-filled sac. Tooth abscesses can lead to gum swelling and pain. They can also be serious and spread to other parts of the body, so it is essential to see a dentist quickly.

Treatment

Treatment for gum pain depends upon the underlying cause.

For people with gum disease, for example, a dentist may recommend professional cleaning to remove plaque and tartar from the gums. They may also prescribe an antibacterial mouthwash, such as one containing alcohol or chlorhexidine, to kill excess bacteria and prevent the future build up of plaque.

If a person has severe gum disease, a dentist may recommend surgery to repair bone or gum loss that the condition has caused. Sometimes, this can include bone and tissue grafting to encourage the growth of new, healthy tissue.

People with tooth abscesses may require root canal treatment. During this procedure, a dentist will remove the infected pulp, or soft tissue inside the tooth, and the abscess from the root and then repair and seal the damaged tooth.

Gum pain due to sinusitis usually lessens once the infection clears up. For bacterial infections, a doctor may prescribe antibiotics.

Home remedies

People with gum pain that they cannot explain should see their dentist for a checkup. However, some simple home remedies may help relieve the discomfort. These include:

  • Gargling salt water. A person can prepare a gargle by mixing 1 teaspoon of salt with 8 ounces of warm water.
  • Clove oil. Applying clove oil to gums can reduce pain and swelling.
  • Pain medication. Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, can help to reduce gum pain.
  • Brushing carefully. Brush sore, swollen, or bleeding areas of the gums gently.

Avoiding foods that can irritate or scratch the gums may also help while they are healing. Examples include:

  • acidic foods, such as citrus fruits and tomatoes
  • sharp or scratchy foods, such as chips, nuts, or pretzels
  • spicy foods, such as those containing chilis or other hot peppers

For people with canker sores, taking vitamin and mineral supplements, such as iron and vitamin B-12, may help reduce gum pain.

Prevention

Good oral hygiene can help prevent gum pain and other dental issues. This includes:

  • brushing teeth twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste for at least 2 minutes
  • flossing once daily
  • using a dental mouthwash daily
  • having regular checkups with a dentist, such as every 6 months

If a person stops smoking, this can also improve gum health. Smoking can reduce blood flow to the gums, which may impair healing and lead to discomfort.

When to see a dentist

It is advisable for people with severe, persistent, or recurring gum pain to see a dentist for a checkup.

A dentist can examine the gums, teeth, and mouth for signs of infection, tooth decay, and other dental issues.

A person may also want to consider seeing a dentist if the pain occurs alongside any of the following symptoms:

  • bad breath that does not improve with tooth brushing
  • bleeding gums
  • gums that are receding
  • loose teeth
  • pain when chewing
  • red gums
  • sensitive teeth

Summary

There are many possible causes of gum pain, including gum disease, infections, abscesses, and ulcers.

People with gum pain they cannot explain may wish to consider seeing a dentist for a checkup. Without treatment, some causes of gum pain can lead to tooth decay or tooth loss.

Home remedies for gum pain include applying clove oil to gums, rinsing the mouth with salt water, and avoiding irritating foods.

Source: bit.ly/gum-pain

Breastfeeding: 6 Things Nursing Moms Should Know About Dental Health

By: Mouth Healthy, American Dental Association (ADA)

🤱 Breastfeeding can help your baby’s body fight infections and reduce health risks like asthma, ear infections, SIDS and obesity in children and studies show nursing moms may lower their chances of developing breast and ovarian cancer.

But did you know breastfeeding can impact the dental health of both baby and mom? The American Dental Association explains how. The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Breastfeeding is one of the first (and most personal) decisions a mother makes for her baby. It can help your baby’s body fight infections and reduce health risks like asthma, ear infections, SIDS and obesity in children. Nursing moms may lower their chances of developing breast and ovarian cancer. But did you know breastfeeding can impact the dental health of both baby and mom? Here’s how:

Breastfeeding May Help Build a Better Bite

Several recent studies, one in Pediatrics in 2015 and one in the August 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, found that babies who were exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months were less likely to have teeth alignment issues such as open bites, crossbites, and overbites, than those exclusively breastfed for shorter lengths of time or not at all.

Still, this doesn’t mean your exclusively breastfed baby won’t need braces someday. Other factors, including genetics, pacifier use, and thumbsucking, affect alignment. “Every baby, every child is different,” says Dr. Ruchi Sahota, mother and American Dental Association spokesperson. “The best thing for a mom to do is to take the child to the dentist and make sure the dentist is able to monitor eruption, that baby teeth are coming out at the right time and permanent teeth are coming in at the right time.”

You Don’t Have to Wean When Your Baby Gets Teeth

It’s a question that often pops up in parenting message boards and conversations with new moms: Should I stop breastfeeding when my baby starts teething? The answer is not if you don’t want to.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding for the first year of a baby’s life; the World Health Organization encourages moms to go for two. “As it goes with breastfeeding, every child is different, every mother is different,” Dr. Sahota says. “You should stop breastfeeding when you think it’s the best for you and the baby but not just because the teeth come in.”

Breastfeeding Reduces the Risk for Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Another benefit of exclusive breastfeeding, Dr. Sahota says, is a reduced risk of baby bottle tooth decay, the frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar. This type of tooth decay often occurs when a baby is put to bed with a bottle – even ones containing formula, milk or fruit juice. (Water is fine because the teeth won’t be bathed in sugary liquids for a prolonged time.) It most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected.

Breastfed Babies Can Still Get Cavities

It’s one of the most common questions nursing mothers ask: Can breastfeeding cause cavities? Yes, it can. Although natural, breast milk, just like formula, contains sugar. That is why breastfed or bottle fed, it’s important to care for your baby’s teeth from the start. A few days after birth, begin wiping your baby’s gums with a clean, moist gauze pad or washcloth every day. Then, brush her teeth twice a day as soon as that first tooth emerges. Use fluoride toothpaste in an amount no more than a smear or the size of a grain of rice.

Need Dental Work Done? Double Check Your Medications

If you need to have a dental procedure that requires medication while nursing, check with your dentist, personal physician, and pediatrician to make sure it is safe for baby. “It’s important to know there are antibiotics we can give you that won’t hurt the baby,” Dr. Sahota says. “It’s not only safe to go to the dentist while you’re pregnant and while you’re nursing, but it’s also very important to do so for the best health of your child.”

Another helpful resource for nursing moms is the U.S National Library of Medicine’s Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed). Simply search for any medication and get information about how it affects your supply, your baby and if there’s an alternative available. Talk to your doctor about what you find.

Mom, Take Care of Yourself

Dr. Sahota says there’s one thing she sees in new moms, breastfeeding or not. “I definitely see moms who are, as simple as it sounds, are not able to take care of themselves as well as they did before the baby,” she says. “Moms that are just not brushing as much as they used to, whether they’re brushing once a day or not brushing at all.”

A dip in dental care could lead to more gum disease and cavities. Cavity prevention is especially crucial for moms, as even the simple act of sharing a spoon with could transfer that bacteria into your baby’s mouth. “It’s really important to do the basics: Brush twice a day, floss once a day. See your ADA dentist regularly,” she says. “Make sure you have prevented decay and don’t have any cavities so you don’t transfer that to your baby.”

Dr. Sahota says she also sees more teeth grinding (bruxism) in moms. “I see a lot more head and neck muscle tension, which causes our jaws to be a little bit tenser and then that causes us to grind our teeth,” she says. “Trouble sleeping when we’re pregnant, that can cause us to grind our teeth a little bit. Postnatally, stress can increase and it can also be an issue.”

All moms need to stay hydrated, especially if breastfeeding. “Not drinking enough water, that in itself is a very dangerous thing for your mouth,” she says. “If we have a dry mouth, we put ourselves at risk for gum disease, for cavities, so many things.”

And there’s one last piece of advice Dr. Sahota gives all moms. “Just like if you’re on an airplane, you have to put your oxygen mask on first before you put it on your child,” she says. “If you’re not healthy, you will not have the time and the energy to make sure your children are also healthy.”

Source: bit.ly/6breastfeedingtips

Baby Teeth

By: MouthHealthy, American Dental Association (ADA)

👶 If you think your baby’s toothless smile is cute, just wait until their first few teeth make an appearance!

After that first tooth comes in, don’t forget to follow these key takeaways from the American Dental Association to care for your baby’s oral health! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

When Do Baby Teeth Come In?

A baby’s 20 primary teeth are already present in the jaws at birth and typically begin to appear when a baby is between 6 months and 1 year.

Most children have a full set of 20 primary teeth by the time they are 3. Check out this baby teeth eruption chart to see the order in which teeth break through and at what ages you can expect specific teeth to appear. Every child is different, but usually, the first teeth to come in are located in the top and bottom front of their mouth.

When teeth first come in, some babies may have sore or tender gums. Gently rubbing your child’s gums with a clean finger, a small, cool spoon or a wet gauze pad can be soothing. You can also give the baby a clean teething ring to chew on. If your child is still cranky and in pain, consult your dentist or physician.

Why Baby Teeth Matter

Baby teeth are very important to your child’s health and development. They help him or her chew, speak and smile. They also hold space in the jaws for permanent teeth that are growing under the gums. When a baby tooth is lost too early, the permanent teeth can drift into the empty space and make it difficult for other adult teeth to find a room when they come in. This can make teeth crooked or crowded. That’s why starting infants off with good oral care can help protect their teeth for decades to come.

When Should I Start Taking My Child to the Dentist?

After the first tooth comes in and no later than the first birthday. A dental visit at an early age is a “well-baby checkup” for the teeth. Besides checking for cavities and other problems, the dentist can show you how to clean the child’s teeth properly and how to handle habits like thumb sucking. Learn more about how to prepare for this visit.

How to Care for Your Child’s Teeth

It’s important to care for your baby’s teeth from the start. Here’s what to do:

  • Begin cleaning your baby’s mouth during the first few days after birth by wiping the gums with a clean, moist gauze pad or washcloth. As soon as teeth appear, decay can occur. A baby’s front four teeth usually push through the gums at about 6 months of age, although some children don’t have their first tooth until 12 or 14 months.
  • For children younger than 3 years, start brushing their teeth as soon as they begin to come into the mouth by using fluoride toothpaste in an amount no more than a smear or the size of a grain of rice. Brush teeth thoroughly twice per day (morning and night) or as directed by a dentist or physician. Supervise children’s brushing to ensure that they use the appropriate amount of toothpaste.
  • For children 3 to 6 years of age, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Brush teeth thoroughly twice per day (morning and night) or as directed by a dentist or physician. Supervise children’s brushing and remind them not to swallow the toothpaste.
  • Until you’re comfortable that your child can brush on his or her own, continue to brush your child’s teeth twice a day with a child-size toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. When your child has two teeth that touch, you should begin cleaning between their teeth daily.

Source: bit.ly/babyteethimportance

Which comes first, brushing or flossing? New study shows that we should clean between our teeth before brushing

By: George Bushell, Oral Health Foundation

Brushing may come before flossing in the dictionary, but it shouldn’t when it comes to our teeth according to the Oral Health Foundation! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

That’s because new research has shown interdental cleaning before brushing is the best way to clean our teeth effectively.

The study found that flossing loosens bacteria and food debris from between the teeth, which allows brushing to be much more successful at removing plaque.

Those that interdentally cleaned before brushing were left with a much cleaner mouth than those who did it afterward.

Dr. Nigel Carter OBE, Chief Executive of the Oral Health Foundation, believes the findings of the study illustrate why it is so important to make interdental cleaning part of our daily routine.

Dr. Carter says: “While brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste is absolutely essential for a good oral health routine, this study shows that interdental cleaning also has a big part to play when it comes to keeping our teeth and gums healthy.

“Brushing alone only cleans three of the five surfaces of our teeth, so cleaning between them before we pick up our toothbrush is hugely beneficial. It helps to prevent gum disease by removing plaque from areas the toothbrush alone cannot reach.

“It is a myth that having a good oral health routine begins and ends with brushing our teeth twice a day. This is simply not true.

“The importance of looking after the health of our teeth and gums by cleaning interdentally and then brushing cannot be stressed enough. Doing this alongside maintaining a balanced, low-in-sugar diet and regularly visiting the dentist will make us far less likely to encounter problems with our oral health.”

The charity is keen to highlight the importance of a healthy mouth following a number of recent studies linking poor oral health to heart disease, diabetes, dementia, and even erectile dysfunction.

The Oral Health Foundation’s Guide to Interdental Brushing

Interdental brushes come in a range of different sizes, from as thin as 0.4mm to as thick as 1.5mm. Whichever one you have should be able to fit between your teeth comfortably, you shouldn’t have to use much force. You may find you need a couple of different sizes but the best way to find out is to ask your dentist or hygienist the next time you have an appointment.

  1. Hold the interdental brush between your thumb and forefinger.
  2. Gently place the brush through the gap between your teeth – don’t force the brush through the gap.
  3. Brush in and out of each space between your teeth.

The research, published in the Journal of Periodontology, also found that cleaning interdentally before brushing is better for our teeth because more fluoride is likely to remain in your mouth afterward.

“Fluoride is a natural mineral that protects teeth against tooth decay and reduces the amount of acid that the bacteria on teeth produce,” adds Dr. Carter.

“Having great oral health doesn’t come down to any one thing. It is important to understand how the different choices you make each day can have an impact on the health of your teeth and gums.”

Source: bit.ly/brushingorflossing


Kids, You May Be Using Too Much Toothpaste, CDC Suggests

By: Bruce Y. Lee, Forbes

📌 How do you know if your kids are using too much toothpaste? And how much is the recommended amount that we should give them? Use this guideline from Forbes! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

How do you know if you are using too much toothpaste? If your body is covered in toothpaste head-to-toe, you are probably using too much toothpaste. You also may have horrible aim. However, even if you are keeping the toothpaste confined to your mouth, you still may be using too much toothpaste.

Using too much toothpaste could be a problem, especially if you are less than 6 years old. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that anyone less 2 years old not use fluoride toothpaste. If you’re between 2 and 3 years old, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), and American Dental Association (ADA) recommendation is brushing twice a day, using a rice grain-sized amount of toothpaste each time. If you are between 3 and 6 years old, you should continue to brush your teeth twice daily with no more than a pea-sized (that’s “pea” with an “a”) amount of toothpaste, which is approximately 0.25 g, on each occasion.

Why the limitations? Although fluoride can help prevent tooth decay, swallowing too much while your teeth are still forming can mess up the enamel on your teeth. This condition, deemed dental fluorosis, can result in white spots or lines. In case you are wondering, such a permanent bedazzled look is not a great one for you teeth. In more severe cases, pits can develop on your teeth.

The pea-sized recommendation only goes to age 6 because by then presumably you have enough control to not regularly swallow your toothpaste while brushing. Presumably. By the time you reach 8 years old, your teeth have probably already developed to the point where dental fluorosis is no longer a real concern. This doesn’t necessarily mean that when you get beyond 8 years old that you should start stuffing your mouth with toothpaste. A pea-sized amount should suffice for teens and adults as well. If you are foaming at the mouth while brushing, you are most likely either a werewolf or using too much toothpaste.

A study published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)showed that a significant percentage of kids may not be following these recommendations. For the study, a team from the CDC (Gina Thornton-Evans, DDS, Michele L. Junger, DDS, Mei Lin, MD, Liang Wei, MS, Lorena Espinoza, DDS) and the D.B. Consulting Group, Inc. (Eugenio Beltran-Aguilar, DMD, DrPH) analyzed data on 5,157 children and adolescents who were 3 to 15 years old and whose parents or caregivers completed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2013 to 2016. The NHANES included questions on the children’s and adolescents’ toothbrushing habits. Or should it be teeth brushing habits?

The study found that when it came to following the CDC’s toothbrushing recommendations, many of the kids were not all right. Some kids jumped the gums, with 8.9% of white kids, 10.8% of black kids, and 7.7% of Mexican-American kids beginning to use toothpaste before reaching one year in age. Others started late, with 21.4% of white kids, 17.3% of black kids, and 31.2% of Mexican-American kids brushing off using toothpaste until after reaching 3 years of age. A size-able percentage of those between 3 and 6 years old were using too much toothpaste with a reported 12.4% using a smear, 49.2% a pea-sized amount, 20.6% a half load, and 17.8% a full load on their brushes each time. That’s over 38% using too mucha, much, mucha toothpaste while going brusha, brusha, brusha.

So add toothpaste to the growing list of things that many Americans are using in excess. Don’t follow those commercials that show a full load of toothpaste on a toothbrush. Instead when you go to the bathroom, beside thinking pee, you may want to think pea. Just make sure you don’t mix up the two.

Source: bit.ly/ToothpasteForKids

How long does it take to recover from a wisdom tooth extraction?

By: Claire Sissons, Medical News Today

Are you planning to visit us for a wisdom tooth extraction soon?

📌 Before you come in, get yourself prepared with these tips from Medical News Today! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Wisdom teeth removal is one of the most common dental surgeries. It can take up to 2 weeks to recover fully after wisdom teeth removal. Looking after the wound properly can help a person to heal as quickly as possible.

Wisdom teeth are large teeth that grow at the very back of the mouth. Most people’s wisdom teeth come through between the ages of 17 and 25. Some people may not have any wisdom teeth come through at all.

Sometimes, there is not enough room in the mouth for wisdom teeth to move into the right position. They might break through the gums at an angle or only come through partially. When this occurs, they are called impacted wisdom teeth, and they can cause problems, such as pain or an infection.

The length of time it takes to remove a wisdom tooth depends on the tooth and the difficulty of the surgery.

How long does it take to recover from a wisdom teeth removal?

Recovery from wisdom teeth removal usually takes a couple of weeks.

Some people might need stitches to help close the wound.

The dental surgeon will usually remove the stitches after about 1 week.

Sometimes, the surgery causes bruising, swelling, and pain, which will also require time to heal.

Recovery from wisdom tooth surgery will be gradual, but people should see some improvement every day.

The healing process can be broken down into the following stages:

  • First 24 hours: Blood clots will form.
  • 2 to 3 days: Swelling of the mouth and cheeks should improve.
  • 7 days: A dentist can remove any stitches that remain.
  • 7 to 10 days: Jaw stiffness and soreness should go away.
  • 2 weeks: Any mild bruising on the face should heal.

Recovery time will be different for everyone. If blood clots become dislodged from the wound, or the wound becomes infected, recovery may take longer.

How to speed up healing

Blood clots will form in the place where the tooth was removed. Blood clots are an essential part of the healing process because they:

  • help prevent too much bleeding
  • protect the wound from infection
  • allow new tissue to grow
  • protect the exposed bone

It is particularly important not to dislodge these blood clots in the first 24 hours. People should avoid:

  • brushing teeth next to the extraction site
  • rinsing the mouth
  • drinking hot drinks
  • eating food that requires chewing
  • avoiding sucking on straws, smoking, or drinking alcohol for at least 24 hours

It is a good idea to gently rinse the mouth with antiseptic mouth rinse after 24 hours.

What can you do immediately after surgery?

Pain relief medication may help to relieve discomfort after wisdom teeth removal.

People should take the advice of their dentist or surgeon on how to aid recovery.

They should give clear information on any medication to take and what to do to encourage healing.

Advice might include biting on a gauze pad in the extraction area for 30 minutes.

A dentist or surgeon may also suggest using an ice pack for the first few hours after surgery.

Holding an ice pack to the outside of the face over the area of the extraction site for 15 minutes on and 15 minutes off will help reduce discomfort and swelling.

A range of cold packs is available for purchase online.

People will not be able to drive for 48 hours if they have been in the hospital for surgery and had a general anesthetic. If possible, it is a good idea to take 1 or 2 days off work or school after surgery.

People can take pain relief medication, such as ibuprofen, to help with pain and discomfort after wisdom tooth surgery. Ibuprofen is available for purchase over the counter or online.

Tips for home care

It is essential to keep the wound clean while it is healing. Because people still need to eat and drink, food can easily get stuck in the area where the tooth was removed. This can make keeping the wound area clean a bit challenging.

Try the following to help keep the wound clean:

  • using an antiseptic mouth rinse to prevent infection. A range of products is available for purchase online.
  • rinsing with warm water and salt to reduce swelling and soothe sore gums
  • raising the head when sleeping to feel more comfortable

As well as pain, some people will feel tired after having their wisdom teeth out and might choose to avoid exercise for a few days after the surgery. What foods can I eat after wisdom tooth extraction?It can be difficult to eat after having a wisdom teeth extracted. Thankfully, there are some foods that are easy to eat that may help the recovery process. Learn more here.

What can you eat?

Eating soft or liquid foods can help to prevent damage to wounds. Some examples are:

  • soup
  • jello
  • soft noodles
  • eggs
  • mashed banana

For the first few days after surgery, avoid foods that need chewing, such as sticky candy or chewing gum as these may get stuck and can cause pain and damage to the healing wounds. Also avoid hard, crunchy food, such as chips, pretzels, nuts, and seeds, as well as hot or spicy foods.

If one or two wisdom teeth have been removed from the same side of the mouth, it may be possible to chew on the opposite side of the mouth after 24 hours.

Why are the wisdom teeth so problematic?

As wisdom teeth come through in adulthood, the other teeth in the mouth have already settled into place.

There often is not enough room in the mouth for the arrival of four large teeth.

If a tooth only comes part way through the gum, it is easy for food to get trapped between the tooth and gum. It can also be more difficult to keep these teeth clean, which can lead to infection or tooth decay.

However, wisdom teeth can also cause problems even if they come through the gum entirely. If they grow at an angle, they might rub against the inside of the mouth or the gums. They may cause pain by pushing against other teeth.

Visiting the dentist regularly as an adolescent and in early adulthood means that the dentist can keep an eye on how the wisdom teeth are developing and should be able to identify whether there will be any problems.

Takeaway

With proper aftercare, recovery usually takes around 2 weeks.

Sometimes, a person may develop an infection and will require antibiotics.

Symptoms of an infection include pain, swelling, yellow or white pus around the wound, and a high temperature.

There is a small risk of developing a condition called dry socket. This can happen if a blood clot does not form or gets knocked away from the wound. Dry socket causes an intense, throbbing pain. A dentist will usually need to cover the wound with a dressing.

Complications are unlikely after wisdom tooth surgery with proper aftercare. If someone has severe pain, a lot of bleeding, a fever, or any other unexpected symptoms, they may wish to see a doctor or dentist.

Source: bit.ly/wisdomtoothextraction

Is Water Flossing the Perfect Tool for Better Oral Health?

By: Jacqueline Fallon, The Dental Geek

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s ( CDC ) Oral Health report, over 90% of Americans have had at least one cavity,and one in four has untreated tooth decay. Meanwhile, around half of all adults above the age of 30 have gum disease.

Dentists recommend brushing and flossing twice daily, but for those with gum disease and frequent plaque build-up, one gadget that should be present on your bathroom is a water flosser!

✅ The Dental Geek shares its importance and some ways it can help you! The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Good oral health involves more than having a beautiful smile; it is key if we are to enjoy food, feel confident about interacting with others, and avoid oral pain. Statistics show, however, that many Americans could improve in this department. Over 90% of Americans have had at least one cavity, and one in four has untreated tooth decay. Meanwhile, around half of all adults above the age of 30 have gum disease – according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Oral Health report. Dentists recommend brushing and flossing twice daily, but for those with gum disease and frequent plaque build-up, one gadget that should be present on your bathroom countertop, is a water flosser.

How does a Water Flosser Work?

Water flossers clean teeth and gums through a combination of water pressure and pulsations, which remove food and plaque. They work similarly to dental floss, but the pressure means that tiny pieces of food you don’t even notice can be efficiently removed. Water flossers can reach areas that floss cannot get into; for instance, beneath the gumline at the front of teeth. Users can alter the pressure according to their needs. Therefore, those with sensitive gums may use a lower setting, while those after a power clean can set their flosser on high pressure.

Are Water Flossers Effective?

The effectiveness of water flossers was put to the test in a study published in the Journal of Clinical Dentistry. Participants to the study were assigned to one of two groups. Group One used a manual toothbrush plus a water flosser, while Group Two used a manual toothbrush and waxed dental floss to clean between teeth. The results showed that the water floss group had a 74.4% reduction in whole mouth plaque and a 81.6% reduction in plaque between teeth. The dental floss group meanwhile, had a 57.7% and 63.45% reduction in plaque in these respective areas. The scientists noted that the water flosser was therefore a superior way to keep plaque at bay.

When Might Your Dentist Recommend a Water Flosser?

Your dentist may recommend this method of daily cleaning if you have frequent plaque build-up or if your gums tend to become inflamed. If you have a condition like gingivitis, you may be recommended to wait until bleeding has stopped to use a water floss. For more serious periodontal disease, a water flosser will simply not be enough. You may be recommended a root scaling and planing treatment and perhaps later, a water flosser can play a role in maintenance of your gum health. Water flosses also work well for teeth that are difficult to clean. For instance, if you have wisdom teeth that have not been removed, then teeth may be very tight and it may be very difficult to get dental floss in between then.

Because a water flosser cleans plaque and removes trapped food so effectively, it is ideal for teeth in odd positions, but it can also form part of a daily oral health routine for anyone wishing to obtain an optimal clean. Studies have shown that it is more effective than standard brushing and flossing, so if you are worried about decay and gum inflammation and disease, ask your dentist if a flosser is suitable for you. Flossers have removable tips, so one machine can be used by more than one family member.

Source: bit.ly/waterflossing

Why do our kids have tooth decay?

By: Alvin Danenberg, DDS, DrBicuspid.com 

DYK that the primary reasons our kids have tooth decay and gum disease are because of nutritional deficiencies? Some of the top causes related to this issue are acidic and sugary drinks, compromised gut bacteria, and a sedentary lifestyle.

👩🏾‍⚕️ Worried about your kids? DrBicuspid has some advice!  The Woodview Oral Surgery Team

Our kids have tooth decay not because they’re deficient in fluoride.

Our kids have bleeding gums not because they don’t brush and floss twice a day.

The primary reasons our kids have tooth decay and gum disease are because their nutrition is deficient, their drinks are acidic and sugary, their healthy gut bacteria are compromised, and their lifestyles are sedentary.

These deficiencies also manifest in childhood as obesity, high blood pressure, depression, skin eruptions, allergies, and a host of other diseases. Improper nutrition and lifestyles early in life sow the seeds for many of the degenerative diseases that plague us later in life.

4 behaviors

When it comes to avoiding tooth decay and taking care of oral health, brushing and flossing are important, but four other behaviors are just as important.

I tell my patients that having healthy bacteria in the gut promotes healthy bacteria in their saliva, which allows for normal function in the mouth. This also assists in preventing tooth decay and gum disease.“I also tell them that a healthy body improves gut health and metabolism.”

I remind my patients and their parents to avoid refined carbohydrates. Avoiding these can help prevent the proliferation of unhealthy bacteria and help maintain a healthy acid level in the mouth.

One way to provide the necessary arsenal for saliva to remineralize teeth is to make sure essential nutrients and trace minerals are included in their diets.

I also tell them that a healthy body improves gut health and metabolism. I encourage an active lifestyle of playing outside, rather than sitting in front of a TV or playing video games.

Way of eating

I pull the parents of younger patients aside and remind them that their kids will eat the way Mom and Dad eat. Kids learn by example. Healthy snacks could include fresh fruit and nuts, almond butter spread on celery sticks, slices of raw cheeses, and cut up pieces of colorful sweet peppers. Healthy drinks could include filtered water, unsweetened seltzers, teas without sugar, and kombucha.

My thought is that if they are eating a healthy diet at home, and if they are given healthy meals and snacks for lunches at school, then whatever minimal cheating they do is not so bad.

Dental visits should be pleasant. Children shouldn’t have to be concerned about tooth decay or gum disease if they are getting the nutrients their bodies need to thrive. Kids should clean their mouths appropriately but they must eat nutritiously. Their mouths will thank them and their overall health will thank them.

Source: http://bit.ly/kidstoothdecay