Posts

Worth the Cost: How Oral Surgery Helps Avoid Emergencies in the Long Run

Welcome to our first article discussing the benefits of oral surgery and how it can prevent serious dental issues further down the line. Fears and anxieties around surgical procedures may deter some people from making an appointment with their oral surgeon, which could save them so much hardship in the long run. We hope that by increasing the understanding of how oral surgery works to halt dental issues in their tracks, we can help empower people to take that all-important step of booking a procedure they need.

Oral surgery is essential for dealing with many dental concerns, from wisdom tooth removal to surgery to realign your jaw. Delaying these issues doesn’t just mean the problem will continue — it all but guarantees the problem will get worse. Let’s explore the benefits of booking an appointment to get your dental issues dealt with right away.

Reduced Pain

Anxiety ahead of any surgery is normal. Various studies worldwide show that surgery is closely linked to increased anxiety levels due to a fear of increased pain, concerns about recovery time, and even a fear that a procedure might not go as planned.

The main point to remember if your oral surgeon recommends that you undergo a surgical procedure is that they are trying to reduce your level of pain. For example, an impacted wisdom tooth can be incredibly painful. It can push on other teeth, make your jaw ache, and even leave you reliant on daily painkillers — which can be detrimental to your health in different ways. Wisdom tooth removal is an oral surgical procedure with a possible recovery time of 1-2 weeks, during which time you may experience swelling, mild bruising, and stiffness in the jaw. But once that stiffness and swelling go away, you will be pain-free. Beyond that, you avoid the risk of further complications that could lead to you needing even more involved procedures in the future.

Fewer Complications

When you book an appointment with your oral surgeon for an essential procedure, you’re saving yourself from the risk of a whole range of additional complications. Let’s go back to the example of wisdom tooth removal. Leaving your wisdom tooth trapped under the gum or partially erupted will cause you ongoing pain. But did you know you also put yourself at risk of infection? Because impacted teeth can damage the gums, surrounding teeth, and even your jaw, they can create small wounds that allow bacteria to take hold. Those bacteria can lead to painful infections or even a serious form of gum disease called pericoronitis.

Dealing with severe gum disease can be a much more complex and lengthy process than oral surgery. It often calls for repeated appointments for gum scaling and root planing, a procedure where tools are used to physically smooth away the surface of your teeth under the gums. You may also need one or more courses of antibiotics, and if you don’t remove the wisdom tooth causing the problem, there is no guarantee the issues won’t return.

Another possible result of impacted wisdom teeth is that you can develop a cyst or even a tumor in your jaw. If this happens, you can require far more extensive oral surgery, even to the point of having part of your jawbone removed.

It’s clear that the much more efficient and straightforward wisdom tooth removal procedure is safer and far more beneficial for your overall health.

A Financial Consideration

One of the other factors that can stop people from choosing oral surgery is the potential cost. For example, if you’re playing sports and take a blow to the mouth that cracks one of your teeth, it can be tempting to leave it if you’re worried about the financial implications. But that cracked tooth can become a highway for infection to enter your body. The exposed inner tooth pulp is vulnerable to bacteria, and if the crack worsens, the tooth could even break completely. This can lead to pain, facial swelling, and even dental abscesses. Whatever the cost of your initial procedure, you will undoubtedly spend more money on dealing with the secondary complications of what was initially a relatively simple procedure.

Always discuss any financial conwith your oral surgeon or their team. They’ll be able to let you know what the best way forward is and compare the cost of a single procedure now with the potential future expense should you elect not to undergo surgery.

It’s important to note that your oral surgeon will only ever recommend a surgical procedure when it’s absolutely necessary. They will talk you through the process and what to expect so you can be as calm and prepared as possible. If you’ve been suffering from tooth pain or inflamed or bleeding gums, or if you have a dental emergency such as a cracked or broken tooth, talk to an oral surgeon and find out their expert recommendation. Contact Oral Surgery DC for more information.

Impacted Teeth: What You Need to Know for Successful Removal and Recovery

Impacted teeth are pretty common, and happen with a tooth that doesn’t grow out, or erupt, naturally continues growing under the gum instead. While the most common impacted teeth are wisdom teeth, other teeth can be blocked from erupting properly as well.

If you have an impacted tooth, your dentist will recommend that you see a specialist for removal or assisted eruption. You’ll need to consult an experienced oral surgeon to ensure the success of the procedure and full, quick recovery. Here are a few things you need to know about treating impacted teeth.

 

Impacted Teeth: How Common Are They?

Studies show that up to 35% of people experience an impacted tooth, with wisdom teeth being the most common by far. Usually, these teeth don’t fully emerge due to a lack of space in the jaw or because they grow in at the wrong angle. In many cases, impacted teeth don’t cause any symptoms for some time. Your dentist is likely to discover the problem during a routine x-ray.
Besides wisdom teeth, other teeth can be impacted as well. The second most common impacted teeth are maxillary (upper jaw) canines. About 2% of the population needs surgery to uncover these teeth.

 

Symptoms of Impacted Teeth: Can You Feel Them?

While many people don’t notice any symptoms for quite a while, once the impacted tooth starts causing problems, you could experience:

  • Swollen or red gums
  • Tender and bleeding gums
  • Bad breath
  • A bad taste in your mouth
  • Problems opening your mouth
  • Jaw pain when biting and chewing
  • Swollen lymph nodes in your neck

If the impacted tooth is erupting at an angle, it can also damage the nearby tooth, causing pain and inflammation.

An impacted wisdom tooth doesn’t affect your overall quality of life until it starts causing problems. Some people live with impacted wisdom teeth for decades without experiencing any discomfort.

If you have impacted or partially impacted maxillary canines, you may want to treat them to restore the aesthetic appeal of your mouth. Treating them requires a comprehensive approach by your dentist, oral surgeon, and orthodontist.

 

Impacted Wisdom Teeth Complications: Do You Need Treatment?

Besides physical discomfort, impacted and partially impacted wisdom teeth can cause a variety of problems if left untreated.

  • Pericoronitis — This is an inflammation of the gum tissue that surrounds the impacted tooth. Besides discomfort and a bad taste in your mouth, this condition can develop into more severe and painful symptoms.
  • Damage to nearby teeth — If an impacted wisdom tooth grows in at a wrong angle, it can push against the second molar. This could lead to damage or infection. Extensive pressure could also cause teeth crowding, which in turn would require orthodontic treatment.
  • Cysts — Wisdom teeth develop in a sac inside the jawbone. If a tooth doesn’t erupt, the sac can fill with fluid, which could result in a cyst. In rare cases, a benign tumor can develop. To deal with the problem, a surgeon may need to remove bone and tissue.
  • Caries — Partially impacted teeth are more likely to develop caries–or cavities–than fully erupted teeth. This is because tooth decay is more likely in areas of the mouth that are harder to clean.

All the above complications can be avoided with timely discovery and treatment of impacted teeth.

 

Treatments for Impacted Teeth

If your dentist discovers an impacted tooth during a routine x-ray, he or she will assess the severity and impact of the situation and either recommend waiting and monitoring the tooth, or seeing an oral surgeon whose treatments can include:

 

Surgical Removal

When an impacted wisdom tooth starts causing problems, you need to consult an oral surgeon. Surgical removal or extraction is a highly recommended solution for the problem of impacted wisdom teeth – for complicated extractions and for patient comfort, the procedure is usually done under general anesthesia – which means you can be asleep during the procedure.

Healing from an impacted tooth depends not only on the position of the tooth, but also on the age of the patient. As we age, our teeth ossify, or become, set into the jawbone, causing a longer healing time from an extraction procedure. Patients under the age of twenty-five usually heal more quickly from an extraction procedure as their teeth are not yet ossified. Keep in mind that everyone heals at a different pace, but typical healing times is 3-5 days of resting at home post-procedure. Pain management prescriptions may also be given depending on need and the patient’s medical profile.

 

Assisted Eruption

If it’s your maxillary canines that are impacted, the treatment usually requires a coordinated effort between your oral surgeon and orthodontist:

  • An oral surgeon cuts the gum to push it back and expose the impacted tooth. In some cases, the surgeon will also remove some of the bone surrounding the tooth’s crown.
  • An orthodontist attaches brackets and a chain to help move the tooth into its natural position.

The surgery is done under general or local anesthesia on an outpatient basis.

 

Working with an Experienced Oral Surgeon

If you think you have an impacted tooth, contact your dentist as soon as possible for a checkup and x-ray. Even if the tooth isn’t causing any discomfort, it needs regular monitoring.

If your dentist recommends surgical removal, you’ll need to consult an experienced oral surgeon. While common, both these procedures require extensive expertise in order to avoid complications and speed up the recovery process.

Contact us today for more information about surgical extraction or assisted eruption of impacted teeth.